The Wonderful Critters of Beatrix Potter

April 27, 2020 4 min read 0 Comments

The Wonderful Critters of Beatrix Potter

Few fictional animals have captured our hearts like those from Beatrix Potter's wonderful and fascinating 23 original tales. From Tom Kitten to Benjamin Bunny, these furry friends of ours continue to grace the literary world (and beyond) with their presence. Not only do Potter's stories remain a popular addition to many reader's bookshelves, but they continue to be adapted for other mediums such as film and TV. So, while we all may have unfortunately spent Easter indoors away from the hopping bunnies (though hopefully with no lack of chocolate at least), it seemed fitting to spend a little time reminiscing about the adventures and escapades of Peter Rabbit and company!

 

Peter Rabbit

Who else could we possibly begin with? Peter Rabbit is undoubtedly the most famous of all of Potter's critters - most likely because he was the first and, as a result, the most successful character of her 23 stories. Originally written for the son of Potter's former governess, The Tale of Peter Rabbit was privately printed after multiple rejections. Nonetheless, it was later published by Frederick Warne and Co. in 1902 and became hugely successful. It has since sold over 45 million copies, making it one of the best-selling books of all time!

 

The Two Bad Mice

The Tale of Two Bad Mice is exactly what you would expect from the title - a fun tale of two mischievous little rascals getting up to no good until their shenanigans are brought to an end. Wreaking havoc in a doll's house, this story is like many of Potter's in that - while suitable for children - it actually reflects slightly more serious matters. This one in particular has themes of rebellion and individualism, as well as touching on Potter's desire to free herself of her strict parents and create a home of her own without restrictions.

 

Mr Jeremy Fisher

The fantastic frog, Mr Jeremy Fisher, serves as the titular character of a story that truly represents Potter's adoration for all things natural. As well as paying homage to her father and his friend's past-time of fishing, the setting of the Lake District is also deliberate due to her love for the location - a love she shared for much of the English countryside, shown through her magnificent drawings. Though published in 1906, the character of Mr Jeremy Fisher has his routes all the way back to a letter Potter wrote as a child, 13 years prior, showing that often the most wonderful things come from the minds of children.

 

Tom Kitten

The Tale of Tom Kitten is one story that perhaps all children can relate to most - or, at least, the naughtiest of them! When Mrs Tabitha Twitchit invites some friends over for tea, it's her kittens (Tom and his sisters, Moppet and Mittens) who threaten the peace by behaving in a messy and disorderly fashion. Once again, this fun and humorous read is alike many of Potter's in that it touches upon real-life situations and matters. In this case, the topic is manners and how children react to them... which, let's face it, is not always how they should!

 

Jemima Puddle-Duck

Critically considered to be one of Beatrix Potter's best books, The Tale of Jemima Puddle-Duck tells of Jemima, a farm duck, whose eggs are repeatedly confiscated by the farmer's wife who believes Jemima to be a bad sitter. The titular character searches for a place away from the farm to lay her eggs in peace, only to find herself in even more peril at the hands of a sly and untrustworthy fox. What's truly fascinating about this classic tale is that it was greatly influenced by an even older and more infamous story - Potter herself indicated that The Tale of Jemima Puddle-Duck was a revision of Little Red Riding Hood.

 

Pigling Bland

Last, but certainly not least, comes The Tale of Pigling Bland. Following the adventures of the titular pig, Pigling Bland and his experiences are all greatly influenced by events in Beatrix Potter's personal life - which, by now, should come as no surprise. The character himself is inspired by a Berkshire pig that Potter herself acquired in her life, a pig she was fond of and described as very friendly. On top of this, Pigling Bland's life changes upon meeting his soul mate is a reflection of Potter's own personal life at the time with her upcoming marriage.

Shop Now

 

Thank you for taking the time to read our book blog on Beatrix Potter's 23 tales. We hope you're all staying well and safe out there. If you find yourselves needing a little extra entertainment during this difficult time of isolation and restrictions, feel free to browse our extensive vintage Beatrix Potter book collection to help you pass the time!



Also in Country House Book Blog

Wandering the Halls of Horror: Sub-Genres of Horror Literature
Wandering the Halls of Horror: Sub-Genres of Horror Literature

October 15, 2020 3 min read 0 Comments

Oh, horror, you loveable realm of madness you. A genre created to delve into our deepest fears, to haunt us in more ways than we could ever have imagined was possible. And, as though that wasn't enough, the decades and centuries have seen horror branch out in unfathomable directions, picking apart phobias, terrors, and petrifying possibilities to unnerve readers even more - and we can't get enough of it. Here are some of horror's most successful and effective sub-genres, the kinds of reads that only the bravest dare to approach...
Read More
Frankenstein: Exploring Horror's Most Tragic Tale
Frankenstein: Exploring Horror's Most Tragic Tale

October 06, 2020 3 min read 0 Comments

Mary Shelley's Frankenstein is one of the most critically acclaimed and widely read works of classic horror fiction in all of literature. At over two centuries old, it remains as effective, haunting, and thought-provoking today as it has ever been, still in print and continuing to be adapted near countless times in a variety of formats. But, despite the effectively macabre and shockingly unnerving events and imagery conjured by Shelley, the tragic "monster" of the story remains possibly the most influential and memorable aspect of this tale. Let's delve into the darkness and take a look at why this is the case.
Read More
7 Reasons Why We Love Vintage Books - Obviously!
7 Reasons Why We Love Vintage Books - Obviously!

September 25, 2020 4 min read 0 Comments

Old books or new? This simple question has long been a subject of debate between readers and bookworms around the world. In the end it all comes down to personal taste, but a strong argument can be made for why either is a more attractive choice to adorn your bookshelf with - and as a vintage bookstore, you should known where we stand on the matter already. That's why we're here to explain that old, rare, vintage, and antique books are not just deserving of a place in your literary collection, but have a right to be there.
Read More