The Country House Library Spring Reading Guide 2020 by Charlie Edwards-Freshwater

March 02, 2020 3 min read 0 Comments

The Country House Library Spring Reading Guide 2020 by Charlie Edwards-Freshwater

 

As many of you may already know, Charlie Edwards-Freshwater is one of our fantastic brand ambassadors, consistently publishing breathtaking content for his own bookstagram - thebookboy. Having been part of our online community for some time, he very graciously put together this wonderful Country House Library spring reading guide in preparation for the upcoming season. Be sure to heed his advice - he certainly knows his books!

 

The Country House Library Spring Reading Guide 2020 by Charlie Edwards-Freshwater

The weather is getting warmer, the skies are finally blue and there’s a feeling of opportunity hanging in the air – it’s springtime once again. But what to read now that winter is finally over? Check out our suggested spring reading list below.


Emma by Jane Austen

Those who ventured to the cinema to see the latest film adaption of this classic will have enjoyed how the more comic elements of the novel were portrayed – but you can’t beat the original source material. Funny, charming and filled with the witticism, social commentary and joie de vivre that makes Austen’s novels so timeless, Emma is a comic classic that perfectly exemplifies why some books should be treasured for a lifetime.

Following the life of handsome, rich Emma Woodhouse and her quest to make romantic matches between members of her closest society, this tale contains all you need from a summer read, including comedy, class and a romance to be savoured.


The Darling Buds of May by H. E. Bates

It’s possible that you’re familiar with the television series starring a young Catherine Zeta Jones and the inimitable David Jason, but the book is definitely worth exploring if you’re looking for something full of sunshine and satire. One of the standout aspects of this novel is the hedonistic descriptions of food – cream cakes smother every paragraph, crisp bacon butties waft through the sentences and the scent of fresh apples colours every page – it’s an explosion of delight for the senses, and the sort of light read that will see you through a spring afternoon no problem.


The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain

Arguably one of the most enduringly loved of American classics, Mark Twain’s unforgettable story of a boy growing up in rural America and getting into all sorts of adventures is a people pleaser no matter what age you read it.

Combining humour and surprisingly succinct social criticism, it’s easy to see why this tale has found its way into the hearts of thousands of people throughout the years. The fence painting scene alone is iconic, pure genius and solidifies Tom Sawyer as one of literature’s most spirited childhood characters.


The Observer’s Book of Butterflies by W. J. Stokoe

Why not combine reading with getting out in the great outdoors? These Observer’s Guides have long been a favourite among collectors and are perfect for budding nature lovers to take out for a stroll.

This butterfly book in particular is perfect for spring and will let you identify the butterflies you see fluttering in the fields, hedgerows and meadows of the UK. You might even find some rare butterflies that are protected or endangered – what more excuse do you need to get out and see what the change in season will bring?


The Poems of William Wordsworth

Who could forget William Wordsworth’s world-famous poem Daffodils? Much like this memorable verse, Wordsworth’s other poems abound in rich nature imagery, carefully chosen imagery and fantastic sentiment. It’s little surprise they make such a beautiful spring companion.

Grab a copy, head for the hills and lose yourself in the words of a master – poetry never felt so good!

 

Be sure to follow Charlie and his wonderful book related content on Instagram - @thebookboy



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